Hey Ho, Pistachio!

Hi Fancakes!

So I was home celebrating my brother-in-law’s birthday this week – he’s a HUGE pistachio fan so I whipped up some pistachio cream filled pistachio cupcakes (that’s right, when we go pistachio, we go all the way). Anyway, I had a whole bunch of leftover pistachio pastry cream that was just too good to toss so I came up with a pancake version of the cupcakes.

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I was going for a Middle Eastern inspired pancake so I brought in some orange blossom water and cinnamon to go along with the pistachio pastry cream. Overall, I think it worked pretty well, although I’m not too proud to admit that I totally oversalted the pancakes…woops. Don’t worry, I fixed it in the recipe (below), but I will say, erring on the side of slightly salty is good for these pancakes because it really brings out the pistachio-ness.

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I also decided to go with silver dollar pancakes because (1) small things are awesome and (2) since I made a “pancake tower,” I decided smaller pancakes would be easier to work with.

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Oh, and if you’re interested in my cupcake recipe, just let me know! They were pistachio cupcakes, filled with pistachio cream, topped with a sourcream honey buttercream (pics are in my instagram feed).

3.75 out of 5 stackies:stackiestackiestackie.75

Ingredients:

(makes about 20 silver dollars)

1/2 C milk

3/4 C flour

1 egg

1/4 C butter, melted

1 Tbs sugar

1 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

1/4 tsp cinnamon

1 Tbs orange blossom water

1/2 recipe pistachio pastry cream

Directions:

Whisk together the milk, flour, and egg. Add in the melted butter, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Whisk until the batter is smooth. Whisk in the cinnamon and orange blossom water.

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Heat a large non-stick skillet over medium heat. Cook 1 Tbs of batter at a time.

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Cook for about 2 minutes, until the tops are bubbly and the edges are dry. Flip and cook for another minute.

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Finish cooking the rest of the pancakes! Take one pancake at a time, and dollop some pastry cream on it. Spread it evenly over the pancake and then top it with another pancake.

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I stacked 5 pancakes at a time but feel free to go as high or low as you want!

 

 

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You Down With PPP?

Hi Fancakes, sorry about the delayed post – I went home this weekend to see the family and to meet with the priest who will be performing my wedding ceremony!! Basically…I just totally lost track of my Sunday.  Never fear, though, I still have a post for you.  This week, I tested out this recipe (from Pretty Simple Things) for Persian Potato Pancakes.

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These were really really good, almost like really thin latke-y potato hash browns. I had them with my dinner and I was so glad I did.  In fact, I barely saved any for the boy. SORRY I’M NOT SORRY.  It’s hard to go wrong with potatoes and onions and since I already love turmeric, I knew this recipe was going to be a hit.

(photo from 1funny)

The only issue I had with these pancakes were that they definitely stuck to the bottom of my pan, so just make sure you’re using an awesome non-stick pan and/or you grease up your pan before you start cooking.

3.75 out of 5 stackies: stackiestackiestackie .75

Ingredients:

1 Idaho potato (medium size)

1/2 smallish red onion

1 egg

1/4 tsp turmeric

1/4 tsp salt

3 Tbs vegetable oil (I used canola)

Directions:

Using the smallest setting, grate the potato and onion.

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Whisk in the egg, salt, and turmeric.

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Oil a non-stick pan over high heat (with about 2 Tbs of oil).  Once the pan is hot (if you drop some water on it, bubbles should sizzle immediately), pour the batter into the pan and spread it as thinly as possible.

Cook the pancake on high heat for 2 minutes, then turn the heat down low and cook for another 10 minutes.  Cut the pancake into 4 sections.

Flip the pancakes, and cook on high for another minute.  Then, turn the heat back down to low and cook for another 10 minutes.  (You may need to add more oil if your pan dries out).

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Enjoy!

Pancake Like an Egyptian

In my continuing quest to explore pancaking in the Northern Africa and Middle Eastern regions, I set my sites fatir mishaltit or Egyptian pancakes.  Truthfully, it was pretty difficult for me to track down a recipe.  I ended up going with this one for ingredients, but took some liberties and incorporated some techniques from this video.

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In the end, I don’t think this is terribly authentic, but it tasted good!  I couldn’t quite get the whole slapping the dough onto a work surface until it’s paper thin technique down, but I did my best to roll and pull the dough as thin as I could to create lots of thin flaky layers.

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I’ve never made my own croissants or danish, but I think these pancakes incorporate a similar technique – layers + butter = goodness.  Plain, this pancake sort of tastes like a dense croissant.  Drizzled with some honey and dusted with powdered sugar, the pancake tasted glorious, like a lightly sweetened, flaky croissant-fried dough mash-up.  Pretty good. pretty pretty good.

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In fact, I realized I had been hogging the faux fatir and offered some to my boy and told him to eat what he wanted…note, usually he’s totally not a sweets person and will only have a bite or two of any pancake I make…and when I looked back a few minutes later, all the pancake was gone! Hmph, I guess I”ll just have to make some more!

3.75 out of 5 stackies: stackiestackiestackie.75

Ingredients:

1 C flour

1/4 C water

1/2 tsp salt

1/4 C ghee

Directions:

Sift the flour and salt into a bowl.  Make a well in the flour mixture and pour in the water.  Mix the dough together and knead it for about 10 minutes. (You may have to add a little more water to get a nice stretchy and pliable dough. )  Let the dough rest uncovered for about 30 minutes.

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Coat your work surface with a light layer of ghee so that the dough doesn’t stick.  With a rolling pin, roll out the dough into a large circle.  Make it as large as it will go and pull at the edges to get it even larger and thinner (don’t rip the dough, though!) Brush the dough with ghee. Fold in 2 sides of the dough.  Brush with ghee and roll out again.

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Fold in the opposite sides, brush with ghee, and roll out again.  You’ll want to repeat this process at least 4 times (so twice more). You always want to be working opposite sides of the dough.  The last two times, I folded in opposite corners of the dough.

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Roll out the dough to about a 9″ circle – mine fit in a pie pan, if you can get it thinner, feel free to use a bigger pan (just try to keep the shape round).

Bake in an oven set at 350 for about 30 minutes.  The pancake will rise up and sink back down, it’s done when it’s golden brown on top.

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Drizzle with honey and dust with powdered sugar. Enjoy!

 

 

 

 

Beghrir Your Pardon

Note: I was just checking on this post and I totally published this on Sunday (3/16) but for some reason WordPress says I published it on 2/18….weirrrrd

So Moroccan Beghrirs are third up inmy North African/Middle Eastern series of pancakes, and I think that they are my favorite so far!

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I also made some Moroccan mint tea (following this recipe) to go with the beghrir and the tea was DELICIOUS.   I followed the whole recipe and made a big container of tea to keep in the fridge for the next few days. Even if you don’t make these pancakes, you should definitely make the tea, it’s lightly sweet, minty, and refreshing, basically everything you want in a refreshing beverage.  I’m pretty excited.

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Okay, on to the beghrirs, pancakes come out very soft and a little bit spongey, definitely a good texture for soaking up the softened butter and honey that top these pancakes.  They’re also really easy to make, you basically blend everything together and then let it sit.  Plus, these pancakes are only cooked on one side, no flipping needed! (I almost named this post “No Flipping Way” but decided that was slightly too vague…not that “Beghrir Your Pardon” really tells you anything about these pancakes…I may need to work on my post naming…)

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In fact, the way that these pancakes soak up all that buttery honey goodness, they sort of reminded me of Moroccan-style crumpets! (now, those were really good).  Plain, these pancakes don’t have much taste at all, there’s only a 1/2 tsp of salt in the recipe, and no sugar.  When I first found this recipe, I was pretty excited to see what the orange blossom water would be like.

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(I ordered this bottle from amazon).

The blossom water smelled amazing – like a distillation of rainwater dripping off of oranges…yeah, basically poetry.  In the pancakes, the flavor was not nearly as prominent.  In my head, I think the effect of orange blossom water is kind of what happens with bay leaves in stew.  You know how bay leaves are often used to impart some “warmth” to stews and soups?  Well, the blossom water had a similar effect, making the beghrir taste more “Moroccan” without actually making anything taste like oranges. …I guess you might have to make them to see what I’m talking about.

3.75 out of 5 stackies: stackiestackiestackie.75

Ingredients (adapted from Flowers and Flours):

(makes 8 pancakes)

1/2 C warm water

1/2 C milk

1/2 tsp yeast

1/2 C all purpose flour

1/2 C semolina flour

1 egg

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp orange blossom water

softened butter and honey (for topping)

Directions:

Add the yeast to the warm water and let sit for 10 minutes.

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In a blender, combine all the ingredients (including the yeast and water) – I let the water and yeast sit in the cup of the blender.

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Let the batter rest for 30 minutes.

In a lightly buttered pan over medium low heat, cook 1/4 C batter at a time.

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Cook the beghrir for about 3 minutes, lots of bubbles will form – DO NOT TURN THE BEGHRIR.  At this point, the beghrir should be done (the bottom will be golden brown and the top will be full of bubbles but dry).

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Slather with softened butter and honey – enjoy!